Learn Sign Language Online (ASL 1 – Unit 6)

ASL 1 – Unit 6

In this unit as you learn sign language online, you will be learning about ASL sentence types.



Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Conversation Practice

If you are learning sign language online with a partner, practice this conversation together:

A: Do you live at the school?
B: Yes, I live in the dorm.
A: Do you walk to your class every day?
B: No, I take the bus.
A: What time?
B: Around 8 o’clock in the morning.

If you do not have a partner, practice signing with Cristian! In the video below, Cris will be person A. Pause the video when prompted, and reply as person B.

Sentence Types

There are a few different sentence types in ASL. These sentence types are not the same as word order. Word order shows the order in which you can sign your words. Sentence types show how to use word order along with non-manual markers to form certain types of sentences.

Basically, you can use different types of word order with each of these sentence types. The difference between each type has to do with the non-manual markers associated with it.

Questions

There are two types of questions used in ASL–yes/no questions and wh-word questions. The only way to decipher between these two questions in ASL is by the use of non-manual markers. You may have already noticed this in the other units of the sign language online classes.

“Wh” Word Questions (whq)

Wh-word questions are questions that require more than a yes or no answer. These are normally questions that use the words who, what, when, where, why, or how.

Non-Manual Markers:

  • Lower your eyebrows
  • Lean your head forward
  • Make direct eye contact
  • Hold the last sign in your sentence (usually the wh-word)

Examples:

  1. HE/SHE WHO? (“Who is he/she?”)
  2. YOU LEARN SIGN WHERE? (“Where are you learning sign?”)
  3. YOUR TEACHER WHO?”(“Who is your teacher?”)

Yes/No Questions (y/n)

Yes/no questions are questions that only require a simple yes or no answer.

Non-Manual Markers:

  • Raise your eyebrows
  • Lean your head forward
  • Make direct eye contact
  • Hold the last sign in your sentence

Examples:

  1. 1. DEAF YOU? (“Are you Deaf?”)
  2. 2. STUDENT HE/SHE? (“Is he/she a student?”)
  3. 3. YOU MARRIED YOU? (“Are you married?”)

Question Examples

Watch the video clip below. Deborah will demonstrate each type of question for you.

Practice these different non-manual behaviors in a mirror.

Question Practice 6.1

Turn to page 9 in your workbook. In the video below, Deborah will sign 10 questions. Determine whether the question is a yes/no or wh-word question. Circle the correct answer. The first one has been done for you.

When you’re finished, check your answers in the back of the workbook. Go back and review the questions you missed. Make sure you understand the differences in facial expressions for each type of question before moving on in the sign language online class. Then, go back and sign each question for practice.

Declarative Sentences

Declarative sentences are statements. These can be affirmative, negative, or neutral statements and each are recognized by the different non-manual markers that are used.

Affirmative Declarative Sentences

Non-Manual Marker:

  • Nod your head while signing

Examples:

  1. SHE DEAF SHE (“She is Deaf”)
  2. I HUNGRY (“I’m hungry”)
  3. I WASH CAR FINISH (“I washed the car”)

Negative Declarative Sentences

Non-Manual Marker:

  • Shake your head while signing

Examples:

  1. ME GO CAN’T (“I can’t go”)
  2. I HUNGRY (“I’m not hungry”)
  3. I WASH CAR NOT-YET FINISH (“I’m not finished washing the car”)

Neutral Declarative Sentences

Non-Manual Marker:

  • Neutral head position (no shaking or nodding)

Examples:

  1. I GO HOME (“I’m going home”)
  2. MY SISTER WANT GO STORE (“My sister wants to go to the store”)
  3. I EAT FINISH (“I’m done eating”)

Statement Examples

Watch the video clip below. Deborah will demonstrate each type of statement for you.

Statement Practice 6.2

Turn to page 9 in your workbook. In the video below, Deborah will sign 10 sentences. Determine whether the sentence is an affirmative, negative, or neutral statement. Circle the correct answer. The first one has been done for you.

When you’re finished, check your answers in the back of the workbook. Go back and review the questions you missed. Make sure you understand the differences in facial expressions for each type of statement before moving on in the sign language online class. Then, go back and sign each statement for practice.

Comprehension 6.3

Turn to page 10 in your workbook. I used the video below for the Number Practice in Unit 5. This time, you will be looking at the signs instead of the numbers. Mando and I signed 10 phrases. Write down the 2 words used in each phrase. The first one has been done for you.

When you’re finished, check your answers in the back of the workbook. Go back and review the questions you missed.

Reading Assignment

Learning American Sign Language means nothing if you do not understand where it comes from. I am going to give you a short reading and writing assignment right now.

Go ahead and read either Step 3: Learn About Deaf History in DJSC! A Student’s Guide to ASL and the Deaf Community or read my short history lesson on the Deaf History page and answer the question at the bottom of the lesson. I know it is an easy question, but please try to write a good answer! I consider 200 words or more to be an answer that you can learn from.

Please do not move on until you read about Deaf History and answer the question! This assignment is an easy way to learn about Deaf History and get you thinking critically about it. I very much look forward to reading your submissions! 🙂 And feel free to leave comments on other students’ submissions as well. Educational discussions are a great way to learn. From this assignment, you will gain a better understanding of where American Sign Language comes from and why it is the way it is today.

End of Unit 6

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